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Palliative Care Summit
November 2, 2018

6 hours CE, Category III, including 1 hour ethics for Social Workers

Register  HERE for video recording only.  Live attendance is closed due to parking limitations.
 

0800-0830            Registration

0830-0900            Introduction/Housekeeping

0900-1000            Betty Ferrell, PhD; Spiritual Care  (Speaker #1)

1000-1100            Joel Frader, MD; Pediatric Keynote (Speaker #2)

1100-1115            Morning Break

1115-1200            Kristi Reeves, MSW; Community Resources to Support Patients/Families (Speaker #3)

1200-1245            Lunch

1245-1345            Gavin Enck, PhD; Voluntary Withdrawal of Hydration/Nutrition (Speaker #4)

1345-1445            Becky Purkaple, MD; Improv to Improve Communication Skills (Speaker #5) 

1445-1500            Afternoon Break

1500-1600            Ellen Mercer; Laughter Yoga (Speaker #6) 

Join Us in Celebrating our 13th Anniversary 

     ​The Oklahoma Palliative Care Resource Center is proud to celebrate the 1​3th anniversary as a resource for health professionals and consumers of health care in the state of Oklahoma.



samis education center parking map1


  




CMS sets payment rates for advance care planning HERE

Screening tool helps identify patients for palliative care


 

Palliative Care isn't only for the dying



Serious Illness Conversation Guide

 




   Featured Article:  "My Marriage Didn't End When I Became A Widow", Lucy Kalanithi

   Featured Book:  When Breath Becomes Air, Paul Kalanithi

This #1 New York Times Bestseller memoir by Dr. Kalanithi offers wisdom from a doctor who became a terminally ill patient to patients, families, and physicians.

 

What is "palliative" care?

It is "HOPE". . . 

The Institute of Medicine (1997) defined palliative care as care which ". . .seeks to prevent, relieve, reduce, or soothe the symptoms of disease or disorder without affecting a cure."

Palliative care is medical treatment that is directed to "care" for the physical, spiritual and psychological needs of patients and support for their caretakers.

Palliative care should be available to both adults and children early in the course of any medical treatment, and particularly in treatment of serious, chronic illness.

It should be provided alongside any medical treatment intended to "cure" illness and continued to provide quality of life "care" when there is no cure.

Palliative care is the response to a patient's and family's hope for effective pain management and emotional comfort from physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains and other health providers who never stop caring, who never give up on comfort, who always put the patient first. Palliative care is the "good news"  in difficult times of serious, chronic illness.
 
Palliative care is not restricted to those who are dying. It is focused on the patient and caretakers to recognize the pain and anxiety which accompany serious, chronic, life-limiting illness. Palliative care should be available to both adults and children early in the course of any medical treatment.


 

OUHSC Family Medicine Dog honored by American Medical Directors Association Foundation in the Caring Canine Calendar. 

B.W. Winnicott, OU Physicians Family Medicine Center

B.W. (Bow Wow) Winnicott, named after British child psychoanalyst D.W. (Donald Woods) Winnicott, and known by children in foster care as "Winnie" is a soft-coated wheaten terrier. She eagerly assisted her owner, Annette Prince, in therapy with Native American children in foster care in Anadarko, Oklahoma, and also helped at inpatient psychiatric units for Childrens' and University Hospitals in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 


 

Address inquiries to:

 Annette Prince, J.D., M.A. Health Policy & Bioethics, L.C.S.W.
Director,
 Oklahoma Palliative Care Resource Center

 Ok-palliative@ouhsc.edu